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Every girl should say “Time’s Up”

As the Me Too and Time's Up movements grow, more and more people have realized how important they are.

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Every girl should say “Time’s Up”

by Annabelle Meloy, News Editor

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Walking up to that podium was the hardest thing she’d ever had to do. It took all her effort to finally speak up about the years of abuse and those who had tried to keep her silent.

She embodied hundreds of other women who had already come forward as she stood down a man that took complete advantage of her as she said the words, “realize now that we, this group of women you so heartlessly abused over such a long period of time, are now a force, and you are nothing.”

Aly Raisman’s speech to former Olympic doctor Larry Nassar perfectly embodies the Me Too Movement, which was founded by Tarana Burke in 2007. It seeks to address the power hierarchy between males and females as a way to help victims of sexual assault, but the movement  never really gained ground until women in Hollywood began to use it as a way to stand in solidarity with one another. It’s disappointing and terrifying to learn that it took 10 years for the movement to finally take off like it has.

These ideas of sexism and male dominance have been rooted in our culture for much too long, and it’s time that we all say enough. The Time’s Up and Me Too movements have given rise to a defiant stance against sexual assault that has been long awaited, but there is still so much more to be done.

Despite efforts to minimize assault in our country, nearly one in five women report having experienced sexual assault in their lifetime according to the New York Times.

These numbers to me are absolutely frightening as they should be to anyone who wants to change things for the better.

The problems with rape culture used to be hidden away behind doorways and mountains of lies as women were told to stay silent or else they’d lose their job. It has become hardwired into our minds that there’s nothing wrong with men in power taking advantage of women. In fact, it seems normal and unshakable.

Men like Harvey Weinstein and Kevin Spacey believed they could say or do anything they wanted for two simple reasons; they have power, and they’re men.

Now what was once cloaked in shadow has emerged fully into the light as women from across all job fields have come forward to accuse wrongdoings of men. Stories of women confronting men like Larry Nassar have given me hope that women won’t be afraid to come forward any longer.

There was a big shift in mentality among the country when these allegations came out as many never realized how bad things for women were, and I was one of them. I knew that women weren’t treated as well as they should be, but it still came as a shocker when name after name in Hollywood came out with an even more scandalous mistake than the last one.

Looking back on it, my thoughts were naive and too optimistic about our current condition. There were so many powerful women that came forward with stories that brought the world to tears, and that made me realize that these things can happen to anyone.

Men that I used to look up to have now been exposed in front of the entire world, making it clear how normalized sexual assault has become. Men not only in positions of power but men who were respected and appreciated for their work were part of a huge line of misconducts that shook the nation to its core.

I used to admire the talent and style of actors like Kevin Spacey as they took the screen in shows like House of Cards, but now all I see is a man corrupted by other Hollywood elite.

Over the years, the belief that men have a prerogative to obtain whatever they desire in our society has grown, and it begs the question, why have they not been educated or taught that these actions are wrong? Many just haven’t realized because there have never been consequences for their actions.

Yet Women’s Marches all across the country have become rallying cries for these groups as more than a million people marched in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles alone in January according to Forbes Magazine.

 

As an all girl school, everyone needs to be more aware of the movement. Even if you believe that there is no way this movement can affect you in any way, it’s simply not true. Women in the workforce today carve out the path for future girls.

There is hope for the future, and right now we should all be saying Time’s Up.

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About the Writer
Annabelle Meloy, News Editor

Hi! I’m Annabelle Meloy, a third-year staffer and Darticated News Editor. I’m so excited to be a part of staff this year and to write stories that...

1 Comment

One Response to “Every girl should say “Time’s Up””

  1. Margaux Renee on February 28th, 2018 5:52 pm

    So true and so well put.

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